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Art in STEAM Learning with Robots

Children engrossed in creative expression have infinite patience. They can draw, color, sculpt or paint for hours. Children become absorbed in their own worlds and muster plenty of patience to sustain those worlds. Adults, not so much. We, adults, tend to worry about spilled paint, and messy walls, and drawing outside the lines. To ensure the A for Art is strongly incorporated into Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics (STEAM) learning, we impatient adults can delegate out some of that work to robots.

Roybi, the breakthrough interactive language acquisition robot designed for little children, is patient. Roybi will listen as your child struggles to solve artistic dilemmas. As Roybi expands capabilities, Roybi will even be able to share ideas and artistic techniques with budding young artists.

Language

Roybi’s 15 languages can expand a child’s vocabulary in specific fields, like painting, ceramics, sculpture and more. French words spangle the art world, but will be no mystery to your young Manet:

  • Gouache
  • Trompe l’oeil
  • Pastel
  • Avant-garde
  • Ouevre
  • En plein air

Add the beauty and elegance of Italian words that help your child understand the great art that came before, and the great art your tiny Leonardo Da Vinci may create:

  • Contrapposto
  • Sfumato
  • Fresco
  • Impasto
  • Tondo
  • Chiarascuro

No child is too young to learn the correct words for the work she is doing. Roybi can help her acquire the right words to describe the beauty she makes. Roybi respects your child enough to provide accurate, correctly pronounced words, repeated as many times as your child needs to master the medium.

Encouragement

Children are almost always proud of their creative work, and justly so. It is only later, with an understanding of peer pressure and wordless signals from adults, that children claim they cannot draw, paint, write poetry, or sing.

Roybi can be the encouraging word to keep your child painting, rhyming and be creating. Art is a struggle, and children grow from dealing with struggles. Some people say art is a creative struggle to make sense of a confusing world. As the folks at Just something remind us, creative people view the world differently from others.

In taking on that creative struggle a kind word, a sympathetic (robotic) ear or a compassionate chuckle can keep a three- to seven-year-old child engaged and happy to pursue art.

Example

With Roybi’s continuing evolution, the little, friendly robot can provide examples of artistic masterpieces to your child. Visual examples, from the most basic (“This is cerulean blue”) to the most specific (“This is a box construction by Joseph Cornell”) can be brought to your child for inspiration, guidance, or comparison.

Beyond visual examples of great artwork that humans have created for thousands of years, your child in the near future can also hear Roybi explain artistic methods, like how a raku kiln works, how transparent watercolor is applied, or how Henri Matisse cut and created paper collages.

Expression

Children are famously fickle. Your young Michelangelo may be passionate about tempera paints for weeks on end when suddenly he discovers the beauty and strength in clay, wood, or building blocks. Roybi is there, to help your young artist find expression in whatever medium she or he picks. With the potential to provide tutorials in working with different media, Roybi can be your child’s first studio master taking on a young apprentice.

Unique

Every artist overcomes adversity. This is a valuable lesson Roybi can give to your young child. Matisse, for example, had to resort to paper collage because of advanced age and infirmity. Roybi can help your child see that her unique contribution to art need never be compromised by physical or intellectual limitations. Roybi is patient, kind, and friendly to every child. Help your child find expression for her or his vast world of feelings by keeping the A for Art in her or his STEAM education.

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